Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Thrifty is a Nice Word (Unlike 'Frugal')

Being frugal is very popular at the moment - there are so many blogs and articles and information sites that talk about how to be frugal, how to save money, how to bulk buy and make your own.

Don't get me wrong, this is a good thing! A very good thing! But how many of you are like me? You read all this information until your eyes get twitchy and you get grumpy, and you bookmark a hundred and one pages and you do... maybe one thing. Two if you're super motivated. Oops!

Artichoke Flower

True, I do write a shopping list. I always have because that is what mum did. I menu plan now, but I'm still getting that down pat. (Next fortnight I'm going to be trying a different method which I'll let you know about.) I use homemade cleaners. In someways it is more expensive as now I clean more. Haha! But seriously, my homemade washing powder works a treat. I crochet, so that covers a lot of birthday and Christmas presents. The only problem is that I now love yarn and if I had no self control I would by so much more than what I do now.

I have been thinking about my reluctance to jump onto the frugal bandwagon and I think I have identified problem.

'Frugal' is a horrible word. I have no nice images associated with it. It looks un-pretty and doesn't roll off the tongue nicely. Y. U. K. It has a good definition: to practice economy; to live without waste. Despite this, I don't want 'frugal' to be the adjective chosen by people to describe me.

Bitsy Bunny, made for a friends baby. Pattern is here and here (Ravelry).

'Thrifty', however, I like. It has more of an old-world charm about it. It has sweet images of aprons and embroidered tea towels associated with it. And cups of tea, steaming with deliciousness. (I'm not a big tea drinker but I'm seriously tempted right now). Its meaning is much, much nicer too: wisely economical (phew, I can still go to the movies occasionally); industrious and thriving (I like the sound of that); prosperous (yes please!); growing vigorously, thriving, as a plant. (Which reminds me, I have to water my herbs.)

Isn't that so much nicer? Thrifty has so much more room for romance than sensible frugal does. Marilla Cuthbert was frugal (I love her very much, but gee, she was sensible and prudent!). Mrs March (you might know her better as Marmee), on the other hand, I would describe her as thrifty. I want a happy home like she had - minus an absent husband and Aunt March, of course!